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Thursday, June 21, 2018

Understanding the GDPR: General Data Protection Regulation

Understanding the GDPR: General Data Protection Regulation


Understanding the GDPR: General Data Protection Regulation

The GDPR–or General Data Protection Regulation–is a regulation passed by the European Union on April 27, 2016, with an effective start date of May 25, 2018. Officially classified as regulation 2016/679, the GDPR expands upon and replaces the Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC of 1995. It serves as the EU’s effort to synchronize and harmonize laws on citizen and resident data privacy throughout its member states.
GDPR is based on Privacy by Design/Default, a set of user-centric principles that bequeath a sacred status to user privacy from the get-go rather than as an afterthought. Piggybacking on that is ability of users to sue organizations under the GDPR who might mishandle personal data. To accomplish this, the GDPR mandates new user-oriented information-handling processes to which EU companies will soon find themselves beholden, not to mention subject to significant penalties in the event of a violation.
The complete text of the GDPR legislation clocks in at 88 pages. There exist within it 173 recitals and 99 articles, each one applying universally to all EU member states. The key provisions of this sweeping legislation are provided below, and constitute the essence of what the law entails and how it affects data storage and retrieval for all related EU entities.

Who the Law Protects

There is a slight bit of confusion when it comes to just who falls under the protective auspices of the GDPR measure. The term “natural person” appears frequently throughout the text, and while this indeed refers to EU citizens, it actually extends further to those merely residing in the EU.
To wit, a natural person in EU nomenclature is any human possessing “legal personality”. That’s a very law-like definition that essentially boils down to a person who acts on their own behalf rather than in the interests of a business entity (sometimes known as a “legal entity”) or a government entity (or “public entity”).
To simplify matters, all humans native to or residing inside the EU with data to protect are blanketed under the term “data subject”. Therights of these data subjects to control and even extensively delete their private data is at the heart of the GDPR.

How GDPR Defines Personal Data

The GDPR defines personal data quite simply: Information (“data”) that can be used to identify a natural person (“data subject”). This seems self-evident on its surface, and indeed, certain identity-related elements fall naturally within this definition, such as name, ID number, home address, and more. But in the current era of sophisticated online data tracking technology, the amount of transmittable, personally identifiable data has ballooned (at least in the EU’s opinion), and with it, the number of privacy touch points potentially available to corporate and government bodies.
This massive list includes, but is not limited to, online identifiers such as IP addresses, social media accounts, email addresses, accounts numbers, browser cookies, and more. Constituent to this are direct identifiers and indirect identifiers, both of which establish the data subject’s identity by degrees. For instance, a direct identifier is a name, ID number, home address, and so on. Indirect identifiers include date of birth, location, or even title, and while they don’t pinpoint data subjects directly, they can nevertheless unmask a person’s identity when used in concert.

Personal Data vs Sensitive Personal Data: What’s the Difference?

In short, sensitive personal data is more or less a subset of personal data. However, as the name implies, sensitive personal data is information that is not as objectively verified as standard personal data. For instance, a data subject’s home address or date of birth can be independently and objectively verified. Under the GDPR, this is personal data, but it’s not “sensitive”. Another way to think of sensitive data is as “privileged” information, i.e. data that must be communicated by the subject themselves.
Some examples of sensitive personal data include:
  • Racial or ethnic origin
  • Religious beliefs
  • Genetic data
  • Trade union membership
  • Biometric data
  • Health data
  • Sexual orientation
  • Data pertaining to the subject’s sex life
The GDPR’s aim is not to restrict the processing of personal data altogether, only to eliminate those instances where data might be processed without the full and clear consent of the data subject. In any respect, the GDPR dictates that data must be processed transparently and equitably at all times. This sounds simples on the surface, but unfortunately for the controllers handling personal data, there are a number of requisites in the GDPR that reveal the attendant difficulty involved.
At least one of the following requisites must be met for lawfully processing personal data:
  • Direct consent from the data subject
  • Execution of an agreed-upon contract or as a preliminary step thereof
  • Legal compliance on the controller’s behalf
  • Protection of the subject’s vital interests or those of another person
  • Tasks performed in the public interest or as an extension of the controller’s official authority
  • Tasks performed in the controller’s legitimate interests or that of a third party unless superseded by the rights and natural protections of the subject, especially children
While not exceedingly divergent from the above, the standards for lawfully processing sensitive personal data are nonetheless more tightly confined to at least one of the following (some of which are duplicated from personal data):
  • Explicit consent of the subject
  • Necessary for obligations to employment, social protection and social security laws, and collective agreements
  • Protection of subject’s interests when subject is incapable of consent, whether physically or legally
  • Processing of data belonging to members or former members of and by a not-for-profit entity with a political, philosophical, religious, or trade union affiliation; strictly prohibited from divulging said data to third parties
  • Data made public by subject
  • Necessary for legal claims
  • Tasks performed in the public interest
  • Administering preventative or occupational medicine, assessing subject’s working capacity, medical diagnosis, health or social care
  • Public health as a public interest, including protection against cross-border health threats or to guarantee quality healthcare, medicine, or medical devices
  • For purposes of data storage, inquiry, and statistics

What Is a Controller?

According to GDPR lingo, a controller is the entity–natural person, legal entity, public agency, authority, or similar–that makes the decision on why personal data is being processed. They specify whose data will be collected, which categories of data to include, the length of time needed to store the data, and more. Not only that, but a controller determines if the data subject needs to be alerted that their personal data is about to be processed or if the subject’s consent is needed prior.
In that same vein, controllers are most often with whom data subjects will directly come in contact. As the public “face” of the data processing endeavor, controllers are the ones responsible for ensuring tight controls on how the subject’s information is managed. Aside from protecting the trust and privacy of the subject, the controller must ensure compliance with the GDPR at every turn.
But just as the data subject need not be an EU citizen, neither must the controller be based in the EU. Controllers can originate anywhere across the globe; so long as they engage in the processing of data for natural persons currently in the EU, they are bound by GDPR guidelines. The best examples of this come by way of social media giants such as Facebook and Twitter; search engines like Yahoo!, Bing, and Google; or retail outlets like Amazon, eBay, and more. Despite being headquartered within the US, these companies must regardless fulfill the requirements of the GDPR or risk non-compliance.
To make matters slightly more complicated, controllers not originating within the EU must designate a representative from inside the EU to help process data in a way that satisfies the GDPR. The representative accomplishes this by coordinating with that nation’s governmental body in charge of overseeing GDPR compliance, also known as the supervisory authority. It’s more or less a checks and balance system to prevent non-EU nations from roguish data processing.

What Is a Processor?

While controllers oversee the whys and whats of personal data processing, processors are the entities designated by the controller to perform the processing itself. The processor may be a natural person, a legal entity, public agency, authority, or similar, and as with controllers, they may also originate outside the EU. No matter the location or the type of entity, the bottom line remains the same: as long as the processor is managing personal data belonging to a natural person within an EU member state, GDPR still applies.
Rather than micromanaging every processing-related task, controllers may choose to rely on the processor’s systems and data security. However, controllers are the ones ultimately responsible for making sure this happens.

What is a Supervisory Authority?

Each member of the EU is required by GDPR to arrange a supervisory authority whose chief duty involves monitoring whether the regulation is being faithfully applied. The GDPR states in no uncertain terms that the regulation must be enforced consistently within every EU member state. To make this a reality, supervisory authorities are mandated to cooperate with one another when it comes to the free flow of data. Member nations are allowed to arrange for multiple supervisory authorities, but one must be chosen as a representative before the European Data Protection Board (EDPB). The same supervisory authority is also required to guarantee that the other supervisory authorities are following GDPR.

What is a Data Protection Officer?

A Data Protection Officer (DPO) is required under GDPR rules to manage and implement an organization’s data protection policies. This applies to any entity that archives extreme levels of personal data. And it doesn’t necessarily apply only to customers or users; any organization with a significant data burden even for its own employees is obligated to elect a DPO. The definition of who constitutes a data subject are far-reaching in the GDPR.
Each DPO will be in charge of educating its parent entity from top to bottom in the requirements for satisfying the regulation. He or she also conducts training for staff members who are directly involved in processing personal data, routinely audit the organization’s data security, and recommend fixes accordingly. In addition, DPOs also liaison with supervisory authorities and enforce the entity’s compliance not only with the GDPR, but with member state laws as well.
Data subjects may interact with DPOs as their main point of contact, too. As the public “face” of the data processing operation, DPOs carry a host of responsibilities, all with the goal of remaining as open, transparent, and subject-focused as possible. These include:
  • Inform subjects for which purposes their data is being processed
  • Provide access to their data
  • Explain the safeguards enacted by the company to secure their data
  • Disclose the involvement of third parties
  • Disclose the duration that their data will be archived
  • Respect the subject’s right to have their data deleted
  • Fulfill all data requests from subjects with timeliness and/or inside of one month from receiving the request
Take, for instance, a security firm that utilizes closed-circuit TV to surveil and monitor either communal areas or private businesses. Because their core activities constitute a public task, this firm would need to elect a DPO. The same is true for any processor that engages in minimal data retrieval or processing such as call centers. By contrast, entities that provide ancillary support, including payroll and IT support, need not install a DPO.
Exactly who can serve as DPO is left largely to the entity’s discretion. The DPO may be “in-house” or external, and they may perform other tasks for the company as well. However, they may do so with the proviso that their work for the company and their work as DPO does not create a conflict of interest.
While the role of DPO will look different from company to company, there are a few qualifications that the DPO must meet as outlined in the GDPR. These include:
  • Expertise in data protection law, both national and European
  • In-depth knowledge of the GDPR
  • Comprehensive understanding of the organization’s data processing structure
  • Ethics and integrity
  • Free to carry out their tasks independently

Data Breaches

We tend to think of “data breach” in rigid terms connoting the theft of confidential information from within the confines of an otherwise guarded data security system. With the GDPR, however, a data breach does not begin or end at theft but instead is defined much more broadly. It can include accidental or illegal destruction, loss, change, unauthorized access to or disclosure of personal data whether processed or archived. Once a breach occurs, controllers must notify the supervisory authority without “undue delay” or inside of 72 hours. This deadline holds true whether the breach was discovered by the processor or by the controller, although it is the controller’s responsibility, not the processor’s, for notifying the supervisory authority.
Controllers must then notify the data subject that their data has been compromised, otherwise known as an individual notification. Despite the thoroughness of the GDPR’s overall coda, it does not mandate individual notifications if certain conditions have been met. These include:
Regarding that last condition, the entity or controller is still required to alert data subjects through public means.

The Right to Erasure

The right to erasure is EU parlance for the right to be forgotten, or the right for a data subject to have their personal data comprehensively deleted. A data subject may invoke their right to erasure under four primary scenarios:
  • The initial purpose for archiving the personal data no longer applies
  • The subject removes their consent
  • The subject requests erasure in the event of non-compliance with GDPR guidelines or breach of data security
  • Legal reasons

Data Minimization

Data minimization is one of the more important Privacy by Design/Default principles mandated by the GDPR, and as the name suggests, it’s all about minimizing the amount of data that is collected, processed, and archived. Controllers are duty-bound to gather only as much personal data as is needed to perform the required task and reserve said data exclusively for the task in question, i.e. no migrating personal data from Task A over to Task B unless the data subject has consented.
Keeping with similar principles laid out elsewhere in the GDPR, data minimization requires controllers to limit the processing of a subject’s personal data according to certain stipulations. More specifically, this means only data that is relevant, adequate, and necessary to the purpose for which it was originally collected. Anything beyond this violates the GDPR and opens the entity to fines.

Right to Rectification

Privacy by design/default may be at the heart of the GDPR as a whole, but part-and-parcel therein is the right of data subjects to contest the processing of inaccurate or incomplete data. They may do so by requesting that the controller in question rectify their associated data, whether correcting false information, filling in missing data, or amending data with a clarifying statement. Controllers must respond to such requests in a timely manner or no later than one month from receipt. 

Consequences for Failure To Comply

The consequences for failing to comply with the GDPR vary depending upon the transgression and can be divided between administrative fines and fines for breaches, whether a data breach or breach of consent, privacy, and the like. For failure to comply with administrative or preparedness standards, entities may be fined the greater of 2% annual global turnover or 10 million euros. Fines for breaches are double at 4% of annual turnover and 20 million euros, whichever is greater.

Conclusion

Without a doubt, the GDPR poses many new risks and challenges for data processing entities across the world who traffic in the personal data of EU residents. Perhaps even scarier is that the stress on collection, processing, and record keeping systems won’t be entirely calculable until after the regulation has actually gone into effect, leaving controllers and processors doing their best to tread water, so to speak, and avoid fines for non-compliance. The trade-off for successfully implementing the regulation, however, is worth it. Users’ personal data will be much less prone to abuse, translating to renewed confidence and trust on the part of data subjects, and greater engagement between all parties involved.
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Dan Sincavage

Dan Sincavage

Dan is a Co-Founder of Tenfold and currently serves as the Chief Strategy Officer. Dan oversees the Tenfold sales organization, manages strategic partner relationships and works with key enterprise accounts to ensure their success with the Tenfold platform.

Get Paid to Write: 101 Sites That Pay You $50-$3000 per Blog Post

Get Paid to Write: 101 Sites That Pay You $50-$3000 per Blog Post

Last Updated May 6, 2018 (This post may contain affiliate links.)

Wanna get paid to write articles at home? These places will pay you to blog just about anything...

Getting paid to write articles from home is a dream job for a lot of us.
And who wouldn’t like to get paid to blog about anything?
Freelance writing is actually one the easiest ways to make money online.
  • There is no investment required.
  • You don’t have to pay any “start up” fee.
  • The pay is relatively fast. In fact, there are many blogs and online magazines that pay you for storiesand articles instantly.
  • And there is no shortage of freelance writing gigs.
The only problem is finding sites that pay decent money for your content.
But that’s no longer a problem!
We’ve gathered a list of online magazines and blogs that will pay you from $50 up to $500 or more per article.

Get paid to blog about anything!

We all have our own interests and hobbies.
And when it comes to writing, we don’t all want to write about the same thing.
That’s why we searched high and low to find sites that pay you for articles on different topics. So you literally can get paid to write about anything, even your life.
And to make it easier for you, we’ve categorized them all by the kind of topics and stories they like.
Let’s get started…
Table of contents

Vacation/Travel

1. Transitions Abroad – $150 per post

Transitions Abroad’s focus is on people who travel, regardless of the reason – work, education, retirement, volunteering, etc.
They pay around $150 for travel related article.
They especially like articles written based on your own personal experience.

2. Wanderlust – £220 per post

Britain-based Wanderlust targets the travel market as well.
Writers are known to have received £220 for their feature articles (with article length around 1000 words).

3. Great Escape Publishing – $50 to $200 per post

Great Escape Publishing focuses on “the craft and business of getting paid to travel.
Their audience contains people who are mostly looking for opportunities where they can get paid to travel -photography, travel writing, tour guide, cruise crew, etc.
They also publish short interviews with professionals who work in industries that allow them to get paid while traveling.
You can expect anywhere from $50 to $200 per article.

4. Alaska Airlines Magazine – $150 to $700 per post

This is the proprietary in-flight magazine found inside Alaska Airlines.
You get paid between $150 and $700 for every contribution.

5. Travel + Leisure Magazine – $1 per word

They are looking for writers with fresh ideas and tips.
The pay seems to be around $1 per word.

6. Air Canada enRoute – Pay unknown

This is an in-flight magazine read by over 1 million travelers every single month who find the magazine in the seat pockets of Air Canada aircraft and in Maple Leaf™ Lounges and select Star Alliance™ lounges around the world.
I couldn’t find any information on exactly how much they pay.

7. Horizon Edition Magazine – $100 to $450 per post

HEM is a monthly in-flight magazine for Horizon Air. The magazine is read by over half a million travelers every month.
They pay $100 for short articles.
Feature articles (usually much longer) will earn you about $450.

8. Delta Sky Magazine – Pay unknown

Out of all the in-flight magazines, Delta Sky is one of the most well-known ones.
They are looking for “executed stories about travel, lifestyle, and business.
Your article can be short (100 words,) or long a  (2,000 to 4000 words) feature stories.
You can send your pitches to edit@deltaskymag.com, or to: Delta Sky Editors, 220 S. 6th St. Suite 500, Minneapolis, MN 55402.

9. MotorHome – $900 per post

As the name suggests, this is a magazine for RV enthusiasts.
And as you can imagine, they want articles related to the RV lifestyle.
Here are the kind of topics they are interested in:
  • Travel destinations
  • Activities and events
  • The newest motorhomes on the market
  • (RV related) do-it-yourself projects
  •  RV service and repair recommendations
They do have a lead time of about four to six months.
The pay ranges from $100 to $900.

General Interest

10. Vibrant Life – $100-$300 per post

Vibrant Life is a bimonthly magazine with a focus on healthy living – physically, mentally, and spiritually- with a “Christian perspective.
One very interesting fact about this one is that they do accept already published articles under certain circumstances.
Their guidelines page states that they will look at articles already published elsewhere if:
…the writer has sold only one-time rights or has written permission to sell the article elsewhere without a reprint credit.
You can expect anywhere from 4100 to $300 per article.

11. The War Cry – $0.35 per word

This is a magazine by The Salvation Army that has been in publication for over 135 years!
They pay per word:
  • $0.35 per word for original content
  • $0.15 for previously published content

12. Guideposts – $250 per post

They accept articles based on true stories about people who achieved certain goals, overcame obstacles or learned lessons through their faith.
They pay upwards of $250. You get paid after the submission is accepted.

13. Chicken Soup for the Soul – $200 per post

Here is what they want:
Tell an exciting, heartwarming or funny story about something that has happened to you or someone you know.
If your content is accepted, it’ll be a part of the famous Chicken Soup for the Soul book series.
And yes, you may have to wait months and even a year or two until the next edition of the book is published to see your work.
You can also get paid for poems.
If they publish your story or poem, you will be paid $200 approximately a month after the book is published.
As a bonus, you’ll also receive 10 free copies of the book.

14. Power for Living – $125 to $375 per post

Power For Living is dedicated to Christian adults.
For short articles that range from 750 words up, the payout is $125.
Those longer articles (1400-1600 words) will go for $375.

15. AARP – Pay unknown (maybe $1 per word)

The AARP magazine accepts articles on topics such as money, health, business, food, travel, relationships, and more.
They don’t say how much they pay on the site, but from what I gather, it’s around $1 per word.

Short Stories

16. Tor – Pay unknown

They accept three different kinds of submissions:
  • Original Short Fiction
  • Novella
  • Non-Fiction
For Novella submissions, they offer an advance against royalties. The size of it will depend on factors such as the length of the story and how commercial it can be.
For non-fiction work, they’ll send you an invoice with details.
As of Jan-7-2017, they stopped accepting original short fictions.

17.Clarkesworld – $500 to $1,380 per post

Clarkesworld is a multiple award-winning (with 3 Hugo Awards among them) science fiction magazine.
They have a 1000 to 16000 word limit for each article.
You are paid 10¢ per word for the first 5000 words, and 8¢ for each word over 5000.

18. Harper’s Magazine – Pay unknown

Harper is a made in America monthly publication that publishes content about everything under the sun.
There is no information on how much they pay on the site.

19. The New Yorker – Pay unknown

This is arguably the most commercially successful magazine with a large international fan base.
You can submit short stories to take advantage of the amazingly huge readership over here.
They don’t mention the pay, but they do say it can take up to 6 months to hear back. So if you’re looking for quick cash, this won’t be the best option.
But it’s a great platform for getting your work and name out.

20. Asimov’s Science Fiction – up to $1,600 per story

Asimov’s name is universally associated with science fiction and they are much acclaimed by the international community.
The pay is $0.08 for every word, up to $1,600 per story.

Politics/News/Entertainment

21. The Christian Science Monitor – $200 to $225 per post

The Christian Science Monitor writes about everything contemporary, and they tend to have a slight national focus.
Their basic rate starts at $250. But it can go higher depending on the subject and the actual work.

22. High Country News – $0.50 to $1.50 per word

High Country News focuses its circulation on the American West.
The rate is $.50 to $1.50 a word (which is impressive considering that they are a not for profit organization), with a cap on 2,400 words.

23. The Sun Magazine – up to $2000 per post

The Sun Magazine is an elegant magazine with a huge slant on literary stuff.
A typical non-fiction article can fetch between $300-$2000.

24. The Nation – $150 to $500 per post

The Nation is a left-leaning publication.
Here are the kind of content they look for:
  • Comments and analyses of news developments (approximately 750 words.)
  • Articles that use reporting and analysis to create in-depth content  about issues (typically 1500-2500 words.)
  • They also accept poems.
Other topics of interests include:
  • civil liberties
  • civil rights
  • labor
  • economics
  • environmental
  • privacy and policing
  • feminist issues and politics.
For in-depth articles they pay is between $350 and $500.
For political commentary, the rate is$150.

25. Salon – Pay unknown

Salon covers entertainment news mostly.

Humor

26. Cracked – $50 to $200 per post

Cracked a massive and quickly growing humor site that is always looking for new content.
They pay $50 for four really short funny stories.
For feature-length articles, the rate increase to about $100.

27. Reader’s Digest – $100 per post

One of my favorite magazines. Reader’s Digest is actually kind of famous for its reader stories.
So it’s not a supersize that they’re always looking for new stories and content.
They pay $100 per article regardless of the length.

Education

28. Teaching Tolerance – $1 per word

This is a magazine geared towards teachers.
Their audience is a national audience of preK-12 educators interested.
The kind of content they look for include:
  • Diversity
  • Multiculturalism
  • Anti-bias and social justice
They pay up to $1 per word.

29. American Educator – up to $300 per post

American Educator is a quarterly magazine funded by the American Federation of Teachers.
It covers all aspects of teaching from the perspective of policy formulation, labors, trends, etc…
You are paid up to $300 per accepted article.

Religion

30. devozine – $25 to $100 per post

Devozine’s goal is to provide guidelines to young adults in order to strengthen their faith in Christianity.
You earn$25 for meditations related articles and $100 for feature-length articles.

31. The Quiet Hour – up to $115 per post

The quarterly issued Quiet Hour features anecdotal stories, and each one is to be closed with a prayer or quotation.
First-time contracts have a pay of up to $115.

32. Sports Spectrum – $315-$420 per post

Sports Spectrum tends to focus on how Christianity can inspire sporting success.
You can expect to fetch $315-$420 for an article length of 1,500-2,000 words.

Special Interest

33. Pentimento – $250 per post

Pentimento is focused on the disabled community, and making the public more aware of their needs.
They like well-balanced and engaging stories about the disabled community in general or real stories about specific disabled individuals and their lives.
They pay$250 per piece.

34. Drum! Magazine – $50 to $300 per post

As the name implies, it is all about drums.
If you have interesting stuff to say about drumming, you get paid $50-$300 for every feature article.

35. LightHouse – $100 per essay

This is a magazine/site focused on the blind and visually impaired community.
And they are looking for blind and visually impaired writers to submit content.
The underlying theme is not so much on the sufferings, but about conquering adversities in life.
They pay $100 for essays published on their blog. However, they do mention that for long or ambitious pieces, you can talk to the editors for a bigger payout.

36. Porthole Cruise Magazine – Pay unknown

This magazine sets out to collate and consolidates all things pertaining to cruises.
They do not mention the pay rate. Only that the payment is issued after publication.

37. DRAFT – $0.80 per word

As the name suggest, this is a beer related site, thus naturally they look for content related to the industry.
They pay $0.80 per word.

38. Rapid Media Magazine – Pay unknown

Rapid Media publishes four magazines, Canoeroots, Rapid, Adventure Kayak and Kayak Angler.
Each of these magazines has their own guidelines and pay rate.

39. Maine Boat, Homes & Harbors – $250-$500 per article

A magazine dedicated to covering boating in Main!
They like short articles of between 500 to 1500 words.
You can expect between $250 to $500 per article.

40. Country Magazine – $250 per post

As the name suggest, this is a magazine dedicated to the country lifestyle.
You can submit content about anything that relates to this lifestyle.
You’ll be paid a one-time fee of $100 per accepted submission.

Business / Money

41. eCommerce Insiders – $125 per post

They look for content focused on the online retail industry.
Here is how they pay:
  • $75 for articles between 400 to 600 words
  • $125 for articles that are 600 words long
  • $150 for articles longer than 600 words

42. iWorkWell – $200 per article

iWorkWell is fully dedicated to human resource practices.
If you are in the HR business, you can make $200 per article here.

Fiction

43. Fantasy and Science Fiction – up to $3000 per article

As the name suggests, this one is geared towards fantasy and science fiction.
The payout is 7-12 cents for every word, but the payment is a capped at 25,000 words, which means that you can potentially make up to $3,000 per article.

Parenting

44. A Fine Parent – $100 per post

They look for useful parenting tips.
The accepted article will be paid $75.

45. Scary Mommy – $100 per post

Update: They no longer pay. Although they still accept submissions.
Scary Mommy gives parenting a unique twist – practical tips presented in a humorous way.
If you can produce lighthearted yet useful parenting tips, you will be paid $100 for your article.

46. Babble – $150 per post

Disney is the parent company of Babble.
You can write about anything that’s relevant to parenting.
You are paid $150 for every 1200 words.

47. Youth Today – $150-$2000 per article

Youth Today is intended for the caregivers and policymakers of the youth.
The kind of stories they like include:
  • Best practices
  • Survey pieces
  • Issues
  • Management
  • Follow the Money
  • Professional Development
  • Debunking Myths
  • Funding
  • A Sense of Place
  • Sidebars
They don’t mention the pay, but I’ve heard anywhere from $150 to $2000 per article.

Lifestyle

48. Girls Life – $300 per post

This magazine gives useful updates and advice on boys-girls relationship, celebrity gossip, grooming, etc…
Payment can go up to $300 per article.

49. NY Times’ Modern Love Column – Pay unknown

This is the column piece found in the New York Times.
They encourage personal stories in relation to parenting, marriage, relationship and dating.

50. L.A. Affairs – $300 per article

This is another column in another famous.
They tell of the hot and not-so-hot aspects of the dating scene surrounding Southern California.
They pay $300 per accepted article.

51. Heroes and Heartbreakers – $1000 + 25% royalty

Popular publisher MacMillan runs this Heroes and Heartbreakers magazine.
They generally take in articles of 15k-30k words.
They pay $1,000 per story against a 25% royalty.

52. Italian America – $350 per post

True to its name, the magazine is always looking for Italian related stories and content.
They look for articles between 800 to 11000 words long.
You can expect $350 per piece.

Regional

53. Boulevard – $225 per post

The Canadian-based magazine that tends to focus on the art scene in Vancouver Island.
They encourage short articles (around 850 words.)
The rate is 25 to 30 cents per word.

54. Big Grey Horse – $125-$200 per article

Big Grey Horse is a lifestyle blog from Texas.
They like blog posts written in first person POV ranging from 600 to 1,000 words.
You are paid $125 to $200 per post.

55. AMC Outdoors – $150 to $700 per article

AMC Outdoors’ main focus is on recreational activities around the Northern Appalachian.
For short submissions you get $150 to $400.
For feature-length pieces the pay is $500 to $700.

56. Vermont Life – $600 to $800 per post

Needless to say, this one is about all things Vermont!
According to their guidelines, the standard department rate is $600, feature rate $800.

57. 1859 Oregon’s Magazine – $150 to $250 per article

1859 Oregon’s Magazine celebrates the history and lifestyle of the region.
Payment varies from $0.30/word to $0.50/word.
They pay after publication.

58. Colorado Life Magazine – $75 to $975 per story

Colorado Life Magazine is dedicated to the entire Colorado state and the magazine uses clever and colorful storytelling to illustrate the many attractions in the state.
The rate ranges from $75 to $125 for short stories and $130-$975 if they are feature-length articles.

59. Alaska Magazine – $1500 per post

Alaska Magazine is well-known for its narrative style used to describe Alaska life in general.
Payment can go up to $1,500 subject to the article length and accompanying photo(s).

60. South Carolina Living – $200 – $450 per post

This is a lifestyle magazine published for the member-owners of South Carolina’s not-for-profit electric cooperatives.
Here are the kind of content they want:
Features: Pocketbook energy issues and travel/lifestyle/general-interest topics.
  • Length: 1,500 to 3,000 words.
  • Rate: $450
Departments SC Stories: These are one-page mini-profiles.
  • Length: 350 words
  • Rate: $200
SC Travels: Two-page stories on interesting places to visit in South Carolina.
  • Length: 500-750 words
  • Rate: $300
Chef’s Choice: Profiles of interesting restaurants and the people behind them.
  • Length: 500-700 words
  • Rate: $300

61. Douglas – $0.40 per word

Douglas is a business magazine that caters to the Southern Vancouver Island’s community.
They are often interested in feature-length articles (around 1,200 to 3,00 words.)
Pay is $0.40/word.

62. New Mexico Magazine – $250 per article

This is the brainchild of the New Mexico Tourism Department.
They like “story ideas about New Mexico experiences, with opinionated storytelling and a first-person point of view when appropriate.
For short articles, the pay rate is ¢35 to ¢40 per word.
Longer ones (e.g. above 600 words) can fetch up to $250 per article.

Kids/Teens

63. Cicada Magazine – up to $2250 per article

Here the target market makes up largely of teenagers and young adults.
The rate is $0.25 per word, with a 9000 words cap, so the most you make is $2,250 for one single article.

64. Cricket Magazine – $0.25 per word

Cricket Magazine is a sports magazine for young readers.
The rate here is $0.25 for every word and they usually restrict to less than 2000 words.

Sports/Outdoor

65. Canoeroots – $0.20 per word

Canoeroots have just three publications every year, but they touch on all aspects of canoeing.
There is a limit of 2000 words on feature-length articles.
They pay $0.20 for every word.

66. Sporting Classics – $300-$700 per post

A magazine about fishing and hunting.
You will make $300-$700 for every accepted piece.

67. Blade Magazine – $150-$300 per article

As the name suggests, this one is all about knives.
Naturally, your content needs to be relevant.
You can earn between 4150 to $300 per article.

68. BirdWatching Daily – $400 per post

A magazine all about birds and bird watching.
For each accepted bird related article or photo-essay, you are paid $400.

69. Sport Fishing Magazine – $250 to $750 per post

Sport Fishing magazine offers a good rate for freelance writers.
It pays $250 for short articles and $750 for longer, feature-length articles.

70. Canoe & Kayak – $100 to $800 per article

They have been around since 1973, providing content for paddlers of every style and ability level.
They don’t mention the pay, but according to WritingCareer.com, they pay anywhere from $100 to $800 per article.

71. Hoof Beats Magazine – $100 to $500 per post

This is a magazine by The United States Trotting Association.
Obviously, this is a very niche subject so you have to know what you are talking about to get published.
Depending on the length, the pay varies from $100 to $500.

72. USDF Connection – $40 to $400 per post

This is published by the United States Dressage Federation.
They look for:
  • features
  • health articles
  • personality profiles
  • how-to training articles
  • and first-person accounts of life in the dressage world
You can expect to be paid $40 to $400 based on the length and depth of your submission.

73. Wooden Boat – $250 to $300 per post

A bi-monthly magazine for wooden boat owners, builders, and designers.
They pay $250 to $300 for pieces containing around a 1000 word.

74. KungFuMagazine – Pay unknown

They look for Martial Arts related content – training, techniques, history, weapons, philosophy, well-known martial artists, etc.
They don’t mention the pay on their site.

75. Black Belt Magazine – $150 to $300 per post

According to the magazine, Black Belt Magazine is the oldest martial arts magazine in the U.S.
They pay $150 to $300 per article.

76. Boys’ Quest – $0.05 per word

This is an educational magazine for young boys that only publishes six issues each year.
They look for “lively writing” that explains things from a 10-year-old boy’s point of view.
They like short articles between 500 to 750 words long.
You are paid ¢5 per word.

77. The Chronicle of the Horse – $150 to $250 per news story

This is a magazine founded in 1973 geared towards dressage, hunters and jumpers, eventing, foxhunting, and steeplechase racing.
They accept the following submissions:
News stories
  • Length: 1500 words
  • Pay: $165-$220
Feature Articles
  • Length: 1500-2500 words
  • Pay: $150-$400.
  • They also accept photographs which they pay $30 to $50 for each.

78. Kitplanes – $250 to $1,000 per post

This one calls itself “the leading independent voice of kit and amateur-built aircraft construction.”
They don’t have any restrictions on article length, but a typical article contains around 200 words.
They do pay generously, though – $250 to $1,000 per accepted piece.

79. Backpacker – up to $1 per word

As the name implies, this one focuses on hiking/backpacking related activities.
The payout can be as much as one dollar for every word subject to the complexity of the topic and your credential as a writer in this particular field.

80. Gray’s Sporting Journal – $100 to $1250 per feature article, $600 for yarns, and $100 per poem

Grays Sporting Journal revolves around the great outdoor, like hiking, fishing, hunting, etc.
The pay scale varies depending on the type of content. And according to the site, they pay based on quality, not length.
Here are the numbers according to the site:
  • Feature articles: $600-$1250,
  • Yarns: $600
  • Poems: $100
  • Expeditions pieces: $850 to $1,000 plus $75 per picture published.
For the photographers among you, they also pay for pictures – anywhere from $50 to $300 per photo.
All payment is made upon publication.

81. Horse & Rider – $25 to $400 per post

As you’ve probably figured it out already, this is a magazine for fans of horse riding, and as such, they want content related to horses and riders.
Their payment scale ranges from $25 to $400, depending on article length, department, and research.

DIY/Home Improvement

82. Popular Woodworking – $250 per post

If you know a lot about woodworking or like to write about it, this one is for you.
They pay up to $250 for a 600-word-long article.

Art

83. Beat&Button – $400 per post

This is an online publication by Kalmbach Publishing Co.
It acts as a resource for everything jewelry-making. From projects and how-to guides, to inspirations, tips, and interviews with big designers.
You can earn up to $400 for feature-length article.

84. Howlround – $150 per post

Howlround is a site for theater lovers.
They make it very easy to pitch your content using their online form.
By filling out the form you give ’em a summary of what you want to write about, what section of the magazine it is for, and a little background about yourself.
You are paid up to $150 per published piece.

85. SpinOff – $50 per page

SpinOff is the magazine to go to when it comes to hand spinning yarns and fibers.
They pay per page and one page pays $50.
You can submit a maximum of 6 pages (or use 2,700 words as a guideline).

86. HOW – $250 to $800 per post

HOW is all about graphics design – from tutorials and guides, to inspirations, show cases and more.
They pay based on a set fee instead of per word.
Columns in HOW typically run around 1,200 words, while features are 1,500–2,000 words.
You can expect between $250 to $800, subject to stories covered and also credential of writers.

87. The Artist’s Magazine – $400 to $600 per post

With a circulation of 60,000, The Artist’s Magazine is one of the biggest publications focus on art exclusively.
They like practical lessons, engaging interviews, lively discussions of timely issues and news of exhibitions and events.
Expect anywhere between $400 to $600 per piece.

88. Pastel Journal – up to $600 per post

According to the site, Pastel Journal is “the only national magazine devoted to the pastel medium.”
It’s a bi-monthly publication with interviews, how-to demonstrations, and more.
According to their guidelines (found in this PDF,) they pay up to $600 for feature articles that can range anywhere from approximately 500 to 2,000 words.

89. Ceramics Monthly – $0.10 per word

This one is all about making things out of clay.
And if you can write about this craft, you can earn ¢10 per word.

90. The Earth Island Journal – $0.25 per word

The Earth Island Journal looks for “compelling and distinctive stories that anticipate environmental concerns before they become pressing problems, stories that scan the horizon for the next big issue.
Here is how they pay:
  • ¢25 cents per word for print stories.
  • $750-$1000 for an in-depth feature story (about 4,000 words.)
  • $50-$100 for online reports.

91. Western Art & Architecture – $400 to $600 per article

This is a magazine for “art collectors and architecture aficionados across the United States.
They have a few different columns and they pay varies based on which column you write for.
The columns include:
  • Artist profiles
  • Home features
  • Illuminations
  • In the Studio
  • Perspective
  • Rendering
  • Wanderings
  • Western Landmark
  • Collector’s Eye
The pay ranges from $400 to $600 per piece.

92. Writers Digest – $300 for a 600-word article

Writer’s Digest calls itself “the No. 1 magazine for writers.
It is published eight times a year and it’s main focus is to help writers write better and get published.
The pay structure
They pay ¢30 to ¢50 per word for manuscripts, for one-time print use and perpetual electronic use.
However, if they decide to reprint any of the content they purchased form you, you get %25 of the original purchase price per use.
So if your original piece was bought from you for $300 and they decide to reprint it, you get paid 25% of $300 which is $75.
And that’s per use. So if they use it 5 times, you earn a total of $375.

Science

93. Analog – $0.08 to $0.10 per word

This is an established market for science fiction stories.
Here is the pay structure:
  • Short Fictions (up to 20,000 words): ¢8 to ¢10 per word
  • Serials (40,000-80,000 words): ¢6 per word
  • Fact Articles: ¢9 per word
  • Poetry: $1 per line

Farm & Gardening

94. The American Gardener – $150 to $600 per post

The American Gardener is the official publication of the American Horticultural Society.
It is a 64-page bimonthly magazine with nearly 20,000 members.
Topics include anything and everything about farming and gardening.
For shorter articles, they pay $150 to $200.
Feature-length articles will fetch $300-$600.

95. Hobby Farms – $300 per post

As the name suggests, Hobby Farms is a magazine for hobbyist farmers.
They don’t publish their rates so expect to do some negotiation, but they are known to pay up to $300 for feature-length articles.

Web & Technology

96. A List Apart – up to $200 per post

A List Apart is a site dedicated to “people who make websites.
They publish three types of content:
  • Features (between 1500 to 2500 words): Pays $200
  • Articles (between 600 to 1500 words): Pays $100
  • Mini-articles (between 500 to 600 words): Pays $50

97. iPhone Life Magazine – $50 to $100 per post

iPhone Life Magazine has a large audience of avid iOS users.
So if you can write about the iOS platform and anything related, this is a good choice.
Expect anywhere from $50 to $100 per piece.

98. The Layout – $50 to $100 per post

The Layout is all about the world’s best and most used CMS (Content Management System), WordPress (Yes, MoneyPantry runs on WordPress!)
They accept anything WordPress related.
They like articles between 700 to 1200 words long.
Expect between $50 to $150 per accepted piece.

99. PhotoshopTutorials.ws – $25 to $300 per tutorial

Similar to the Layout, PhotoshopTutorials.ws also features great instructional stuff, but its focus is on Photoshop.
Here is how they pay:
  • Articles: $25-$50
  • Quick tips: $50
  • Full tutorials: $150-$300

100. DigitalOcean – $100 to $200 per tutorial

DigitlaOcean is an awesome cloud hosting service with tons of features.
They also serve as a kind of library for tutorials and step by step guides about Linux and FreeBSD cloud hosting.
A full tutorial will earn you $200 while shorter guides can earn you around $100.

101. Polygon – $0.25 per word

Polygon targets computer/video games.
They encourage short stories (approx 500 words.)
Expect ¢25 per word.

New additions

103. Unemploymentville  – $50 to $100 per post

This is a site for “anyone who has felt the sting of being out of work.
It’s a rather new site suggested by one of our readers.
Articles should be at least 350 words.
They pay $50 to $100 per article.

Final words

There you have it, over 100 online magazines and publications that will pay you to write on a variety of subjects.
If you know of any other source, please share it by leaving a comment below.
Please be sure to bookmark and share this post on your social media accounts and check back often for updated versions with more sites.
And remember, this list by no means is a complete list. I’ll be adding to this list as I find other online magazines and websites that pay you to blog.

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